Wednesday, May 13, 2020

The Great Gatsby And The Undoing Of The American Dream

Father Rella Eng 204 19 April 2015 The Great Gatsby and the Undoing of the American Dream A large colonial house with shutters and white picket fence in the suburbs, mom putting a warm apple pie on the windowsill to cool as dad gets home from a long day at work. This is the image that usually comes to mind when I think of the â€Å"American Dream†. The American dream is a theme seen throughout American literature. The â€Å"dreamer† usually desires to rise from rags to riches while gaining power, love and high status. Throughout different time periods there have been many different variations of the dream although the principles of freedom, the desire for something greater and self-sufficiencies have been a constant. Two of the ways the dream can be obtained are through one’s self-actualizations or money and materialistic means. The modern day focuses on material items and monetary values are symbols of being successful in achieving the American dream. In The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsbyâ€℠¢s money provided him the company of people. Jay Gatsby is a self-made man who came from no money. He had a plan to achieve his dream of being successful, and succeeded. He becomes so blinded by extravagant possessions that he becomes blinded to the fact that money cannot buy happiness or true love. In the book Fitzgerald shows how ones focus on power, wealth and materialistic things can ultimately corrupt ones dream. The book starts out with Nick Carraway moving to West Egg from Minnesota inShow MoreRelatedThe American Dream In The Great Gatsby Essay1158 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"It is the elusive Gatsby, the cynical idealist, who embodies America in all of its messy glory.† Clearly as Adam Cohen asserts in his New York Times article â€Å"Jay Gatsby, Dreamer, Criminal, Jazz Age Rogue, Is a Man for Our Times†, this phenomenon is indeed true in that the American Dream is presented in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby as an idea that has been depraved into a dream characterized by the constant shift in ethics and fraudulence centered around materialistic visions of opulenceRead MoreEssay on Symbolism on the Great Gatsby1179 Words   |  5 Pagescomplex than it seems. Whereas a symbol as complicated as the â€Å"eye† can mean more than it’s suggested for. Throughout The Great Gatsby symbolism represent color, the existence of eyes and money. The color symbolism is repetitive throughout the novel. The colors represent the different characters personality and their actions. An important symbolic color in The Great Gatsby is the green light. The color green itself is associated with spring, money, hope and youth. The green light stands for somethingRead MoreThe Great Gatsby - Love or Obsession 997 Words   |  4 PagesFitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, it can be witness this misconception of love between the characters Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan, whom say to be deeply in love with one another. The author portrays the inaccuracy of love and obsession through Gatsby’s persona. This character, which the story revolves around, came from a very poor family, but as he grew up he decided to run away and went on in a risky mission to find better opportunities, because he believed that he was meant to do great things in lifeRead MoreSimilarities Between The Great Gatsby And Things Fall Apart1565 Words   |  7 Pagesdictates that â€Å"every kind of suffering has its origins in craving or selfish desire, which is the result of ignorance or delusion† (Quinlan 171). This concept rings true in the novels The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. In both of these novels, the protagonists (Gatsby and Okonkwo, respectively) are coerced by their societies to constantly strive to rise from their humble beginnings, to become more successful and to be respected. Although their initialRead MoreThe Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald1850 Words   |  8 PagesHello, my name is Catherine Wang and I will be giving my Individual Oral Presentation on The Great Gatsby. The American Dream is not all it s cracked up to be in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of Jay Gatsby in his pursuit of his love, Daisy Buchanan. Gatsby makes his fortune to try to win Daisy over, but he learns that the quests for both was hollow. The cen tral conflict pits the classes against one another, and Fitzgerald uses the settingsRead More Examine the contradictions in The Great Gatsby, including its narrative2958 Words   |  12 PagesExamine the contradictions in The Great Gatsby, including its narrative styles. The novel moves on two levels: Fitzgerald makes you see the magic and romance of Gatsbys vision of ideal love, dazzling the eye with wealth; yet, at the same time, the narrator pulls us down to earth revealing the immorality, waste and corruption of those who surround Gatsby and cause his death. Examine the contradictions in The Great Gatsby, including its narrative styles. One of Fitzgeralds main aimsRead MoreGender Roles : The Great Gatsby, The Mystery Of Heroism, And The Scarlet Letter1862 Words   |  8 Pagesoften conflicts with the hopes and dreams of the characters and makes it harder for them to achieve success. The flawed societal gender constructions found in American literature are adversarial to characters in their search for fulfillment. The concept of gender roles obstructing success is ubiquitous in the many works, including The Great Gatsby, The Mystery of Heroism, The Scarlet Letter, A Raisin In The Sun, and The Death of A Salesman. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, gender has

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Saudi Arabia in the 19th Century Customs, Culture, and Traditions Free Essays

The development of Saudi Arabia as a state revolves around different historical, cultural, and societal changes that transpired in the 19th century. The period is considered important in the nation’s history because it establishes the political, economic and social sphere. That is why to better understand Saudi Arabia’s history one must look at these areas to appreciate the role of history and people in the development of a nation. We will write a custom essay sample on Saudi Arabia in the 19th Century: Customs, Culture, and Traditions or any similar topic only for you Order Now Given these aspects, Saudi Arabia in the 19th century caters to the developments that shaped the country to become a modern state and includes areas related to religion, culture, and lifestyle. Political and Economic History To better identify Saudi Arabia in the 19th century, one must look at its political and economic history. Through this process, it can be seen how the country evolved into a modern state and what factors remained important in shaping what Saudi Arabia is now. Tracing its political structure, Saudi Arabia was influenced by the Ottoman Empire and the Al Saud Wahhabi emirate particularly in the area of Najd (Al-Rasheed, 2002, p. 14). The process here then revolves around the different campaigns of Saud as he sought to expand the territory conquering different areas. Among successful campaigns during the 19th century were Mecca, Medina, Egypt and Syria (Weston, 2008, p. 103). The second influential aspect of change in Saudi politics takes into account the development of the second Saudi State. From the period of 1824-1887 there were military campaigns that have sought to legitimize expansion and influence of the al-Saud family and promote the Wahhabi legacy among communities in the Middle East. Though these political campaigns were not as wide, it provided stability among territories that each family/group controls. In particular, Weston (2008) provides that â€Å"it kept the Wahhabi movement alive, ready to influence Muslims again in the twentieth century – and in the twenty first† (p. 107). On the other hand, the economic developments during the 19th century revolved around conventional trading patterns and barter. Prior to the discovery of oil in Saudi Arabia, the 19th century featured trade involving caravans’ transportation of agricultural goods among different areas. Specifically, spices are traveled into specific trade routes and create opportunities among different merchants to sell items (Saudi Embassy, 2010). Also, there are also various goods that are most sought after by different communities especially the rich ones. Saudi Embassy (2010) points out that â€Å"these items included almonds from Taif, dates from the many oases, and aromatics such as frankincense and myrrh from the Tihama plain† (p. 1). Lifestyle, Trends, and Community Development Looking at the lifestyle and trends of the Arab people in the 19th century, it can be seen that people determine their identity according to the factions they belong to. Since specific boundaries and determination of the state at that time has not yet been established, groups and communities continue to be a way to differentiate one from another (Federal Research Division, 2004). This then enables better ways for people to communicate and interact with one another. Also, this is used to create associations and relationships with different tribes and pattern lifestyle according to this idea. Similarly, since the inhabitants of the Saudi Arabia live in the desert, they had to equally adjust to the weather and climate. Due to this, their clothing and manner of travel among communities remain to be the same. Specifically, people wear long piece of clothing both in the body and head to protect them from the harsh winds, hot sunlight, and cold weather at night (Long, 2005). At the same time, they also wear sandals to keep them cool and comfortable during travels and their daily work. Moreover, groups also take care of camels because it serves as an instrument for travel and trade (Long, 2005). With regards to community development, it can be seen that settlement continued to occur along the oases present in the Saudi Arabia’s desert. Here communities are sustained by the availability of drinking water and also serve as protection against other tribes who may pose as a threat to the security of its inhabitants (Al-Rasheed, 2002). Likewise, the place is used to develop food supplies and sustain community growth. Under this process, this provided stability among communities and helped them develop a specific customs, traditions, and culture. Specifically, Saudi Embassy (2010) argues that â€Å"settlements became more permanent, leading to the foundations of what we call civilization – language, writing, political systems, art and architecture. Religion and Culture It can be argued that the spread of Islam in the Middle East particularly in Saudi Arabia served as an important process that shape the culture of communities and groups within the region. Specifically, customs, traditions, and how people behave is rooted in the rules provided by the Koran and the Muslim faith (Federal Research Division, 2004). These Islamic rules and expectations provided believers a guide on how to live their life and determine establish relationships with other people. Seeing this, it can be argued that Islam provided a huge mark in the Middle East and shaped how people interact and relate ideals with one another. In particular, religious customs revolved around the five pillars of Islam. These five pillars symbolized how people should interact with one another and become good followers of Allah (Long, 2005). One concrete example of this is the practice of Hajj. This involves an obligation for any Moslem to visit the holy city of Mecca and renew their religious commitment to their faith (Al-Rasheed, 2002). Other expectations also include the manner of worship, observance of fasting and abstinence during Ramadan. Lastly, Moslem culture can also be seen in Muslim art and architecture. Their influence help shaped the depiction of the arts which includes poetry, dance, literature, and language. Specifically, the development of a universal language in the Middle East (Arabic) created opportunities to unify and create communities of faith. In essence, these common elements shaped the further development of Saudi Arabia’s culture in the 19th century and strengthened how people identify themselves (Long, 2005). Important Personalities One important personality who was essential in the development of Saudi Arabia as a modern nation state was Shaikh Muhammad bin Abdul Wahhab. It can be seen that he both a leader and scholar of the Wahhabi faction. During his leadership, he sought to promote the restoration of the traditions and customs of the original principles of Islam (Weston, 2008). His influence provided the necessary means to create unification among different communities and sought to establish order on how Muslims view the teachings of the Koran and applying it in their religious life and other affairs such as politics. Another important figure during this era was Muhammad bin Saud. He was the emirate of Diryah. His contributions to Saudi Arabia’s history was that he founded the first Saudi state and coordinated his efforts in protecting and pursuing the restoration of the Islam among the Muslim communities in the Arabian peninsula (Saudi Embassy, 2010). Through his effort he was able to stabilize the region until his defeat in 1818 with the invasion of the Ottoman Turks. The last relevant figure that shaped Saudi Arabia’s political history in the 19th century was Turki bins Abdullah Al-Saud. He was the one responsible for creating the Second Saudi State and legitimized the formulation of specific laws and mandates that are still applied today (Weston, 2008). Through his leadership, he transferred the capital city from Diryah to Riyadh and sought to re-establish the control of territories lost during the fall of the first Saudi State (Saudi Embassy, 2010). His efforts remain to be crucial because he started the transformation of Saudi Arabia into becoming prosperous and successful on various aspects related to economic growth and political stability. Conclusion To conclude, the 19th century proved to be an important period for Saudi Arabia politically and socially. This is because it is in this time that the nation state was created. Similarly, this era shaped the ability to shift and develop new political ideals and the birth of a nation state. This also was an important time for redefining the tenets of Islam as it applies to Saudi’s culture and beliefs. Lastly, the leadership of key political figures served as important channel in establishing balance and control in areas of politics, economy and society, shaping the region during the period. All these elements in turn are all beneficial to what Saudi Arabia is today in both the Middle East and the World. 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Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Madeline Barnard (530 words) Essay Example For Students

Madeline Barnard (530 words) Essay Madeline Barnard HS-102-01Professor Coffey 11 October 2016The Opium War From the years of 1839 to 1842 and 1856 to 1860 the Opium Wars started a fight for power between China, and the west. During this time period many events accrued which lead to the repair of the relationship between China and the west. Slowly with many treaties were signed and the opium trade came to a stop ending the wars. The Opium Wars was a time of conflict that gradually resolved over time. Britain was a major power that played a part in the opium trade, both Britain and China fought about the abolishment of the trade of opium. But there were other concerns that caused the hostilities. Some other concerns that caused the hostilities were how the British wanted to open Chinas ports because they rejected Lord George McCartney offers to have direct trade ties with Britain and emperor (Purdue). Additionally, both Britain and China abused their prisoners and used other barbarous behaviors (Purdue). Also, Chinese scholars were concerned and confused how to handle the situation of the new European influence that was seen in their country. This is because some of the Chinese scholars liked the European influences, while others wanted everything to stay the same (Purdue). One global circumstance that contributed to the conflict of the opium trade was how Britain was obtaining the opium. Since China demanded to be paid in silver, Britain needed to find a solution because they wer e afraid that their country would run out of silver. They decide to trade to China in a very conniving way. Britain came to a conclusion that they would trade Opium to India and receive silver as payment. Then Britain would give the silver they received from India to China to get the goods they needed. This was another factor that contributed to the Opium War. Although, Britain did play a big part in the Opium War so did the United States. The United States signed The Treaty of Wangxia, which ended the Opium war and established five treaty ports for the western nations. The treaty also created a crossword for Chineses and Western culture (Article). This made trading between the countries much easier and something they have been working towards for many years. Both The United States and Britain both used China but it was for their own good. For example, as the volume of trade grew, however, the British demanded greater access to Chinas markets. Tea exports from China grew from 92,000 pounds in 1700 to 2.7 million pounds in 1751 (Article). Both countries were doing what was best for them and what would benefit their country. Furthermore, it is shown that a new relationship was formed between China and the rest of the world by opening treaty ports. Throughout this time period, there was conflict throughout China and the west. Eventually by signing a treaty the conflict was resolved and new treaty ports were opened. Creating an open trade system throughout the world. Even though the west took advantage of China, in the end, it all worked out for the better.

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Tragedy In Hamlet Essays - Shakespearean Tragedies,

Tragedy In Hamlet The Tragedy of Hamlet Arguably the best piece of writing ever done by William Shakespeare, Hamlet the is the classic example of a tragedy. In all tragedies the hero suffers, and usually dies at the end. Othello stabs himself, Romeo and Juliet commit suicide, Brutis falls on his sword, and like them Hamlet dies by getting cut with a poison tipped sword. But that is not all that is needed to consider a play a tragedy, and sometimes a hero doesn't even need to die. Not every play in which a Hero dies is considered a tragedy. There are more elements needed to label a play one. Probably the most important element is an amount of free will. In every tragedy, the characters must displays some. If every action is controlled by a hero's destiny, then the hero's death can't be avoided, and in a tragedy the sad part is that it could. Hamlet's death could have been avoided many times. Hamlet had many opportunities to kill Claudius, but did not take advantage of them. He also had the option of making his claim public, but instead he chose not too. A tragic hero doesn't need to be good. For example, MacBeth was evil, yet he was a tragic hero, because he had free will. He also had only one flaw, and that was pride. He had many good traits such as bravery, but his one bad trait made him evil. Also a tragic hero doesn't have to die. While in all Shakespearean tragedies, the hero dies, in others he may live but suffer Moral Destruction. In Oedipus Rex, the proud yet morally blind king plucks out his eyes, and has to spend his remaining days as a wandering, sightless beggar, guided at every painful step by his daughter, Antigone. A misconception about tragedies is that nothing good comes out of them, but it is actually the opposite. In Romeo and Juliet, although both die, they end the feud between the Capulets and the Montegues. Also, Romeo and Juliet can be together in heaven. In Hamlet, although Hamlet dies, it is almost for the best. How could he have any pleasure during the rest of his life, with his parents and Ophelia dead. Also, although Hamlet dies, he is able to kill Claudius and get rid of the evil ruling the throne. Every tragic play must have a tragic hero. The tragic hero must possess many good traits, as well as one flaw, which eventually leads to his downfall. A tragic hero must be brave and noble. In Othello, Othello had one fatal flaw, he was too great. Othello was too brave, too noble, and especially too proud to allow himself to be led back to Venice in chains. A tragic hero must not back down from his position. He also has to have free will, in order to stand up for what he believes in. Finally, the audience must have some sympathy for the tragic hero. In MacBeth, although MacBeth commits many murders, one almost feels sorry for him and his fate. Hamlet is the perfect example of the tragic hero. Hamlet has all the good traits needed to be a tragic hero. He is brave and daring. One example of this is that when he went to England, he was taking a big risk. If his plan didn't work, he would have been executed He also is also loyal. His loyalty to his father, was the reason he was so angry at Claudius and his Mother. Another trait was that he was intelligent. He was able to think up the idea of faking insanity, in order to get more information about Claudius. But Hamlet like all other tragic hero's had a flaw. He couldn't get around to doing anything, because he couldn't move on. He was a full grown adult, yet he still attended school in England, because he couldn't move on. Also, it took him a long time to stop grieving about his father, because he didn't want to move past that part of his life. And after he finally did, Hamlet couldn't get around to killing Claudius. He kept pretending he was insane even after he was sure

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Free Essays on Envy

Envy The Oxford definition of envy is a feeling of discontented or resentful longing aroused by another’s better fortune (Allen 392). The focus of the seven deadly sins is based on religious thought. Envy is defined religiously as† thou shall not covet.† According to the Roman Catholic catechisms envy is considered a â€Å"venial† sin, but it would need to be confessed. Thus, if an individual commits a venial sin and does not confess, one would have to spend time in purgatory before entering heaven (Matusiak). Kevin J. Rice states that the Methodist position that envy is an emotion and that it is the feeling of glee that a person has. Accordingly the individual does not envy an object but envies the people who use the object. One instance would be,† I am not envious of a Corvette; I am envious of a person who owns a Corvette because I would like the emotions of glee, power, and speed that come with driving it† (Rice). Analyzing the word o rigin, the term envy is the Latin word invidere, which meant to look at askance or to see with malice. The Latin root word comes from the Greek, eidos, meaning form or idea (Iyer). In the twentieth century Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalytical theory, defined envy as a major characteristic of emotional distress. His classic example is the Electra theory in which younger girls envied the male penis and thus felt inadequate throughout their lifetime. Freud’s position was based upon Judaic thought and the culture of his time in the nineteenth century Austria (Sigmund). Throughout recorded history are many incidences of groups, religions, and nations who envy each other. Spain in the sixteenth century was probably the richest of the European nations after they looted the Americans of billions in gold. They were constantly at war, their ships were plundered, and their treasures were scattered to the Holy Roman Empire (Zevin 367). Currently, the poorer Muslim ... Free Essays on Envy Free Essays on Envy Envy The Oxford definition of envy is a feeling of discontented or resentful longing aroused by another’s better fortune (Allen 392). The focus of the seven deadly sins is based on religious thought. Envy is defined religiously as† thou shall not covet.† According to the Roman Catholic catechisms envy is considered a â€Å"venial† sin, but it would need to be confessed. Thus, if an individual commits a venial sin and does not confess, one would have to spend time in purgatory before entering heaven (Matusiak). Kevin J. Rice states that the Methodist position that envy is an emotion and that it is the feeling of glee that a person has. Accordingly the individual does not envy an object but envies the people who use the object. One instance would be,† I am not envious of a Corvette; I am envious of a person who owns a Corvette because I would like the emotions of glee, power, and speed that come with driving it† (Rice). Analyzing the word o rigin, the term envy is the Latin word invidere, which meant to look at askance or to see with malice. The Latin root word comes from the Greek, eidos, meaning form or idea (Iyer). In the twentieth century Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalytical theory, defined envy as a major characteristic of emotional distress. His classic example is the Electra theory in which younger girls envied the male penis and thus felt inadequate throughout their lifetime. Freud’s position was based upon Judaic thought and the culture of his time in the nineteenth century Austria (Sigmund). Throughout recorded history are many incidences of groups, religions, and nations who envy each other. Spain in the sixteenth century was probably the richest of the European nations after they looted the Americans of billions in gold. They were constantly at war, their ships were plundered, and their treasures were scattered to the Holy Roman Empire (Zevin 367). Currently, the poorer Muslim ...

Thursday, February 20, 2020

''See Assignment Criteria'' Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

''See Assignment Criteria'' - Essay Example It will also recommend strategic moves which can improve Caterpillar’s performance over the next decade. The predecessor of Caterpillar was the Holt Caterpillar company which was established by Benjamin Holt in 1909. Caterpillar was formed in 1925 when market leader Holt Caterpillar merged with C L Best Gas Tractor Company. The merged entity consolidated its product lines, shifted from gasoline engines to diesel engines, and continued to grow at an even pace even during the Great Depression. During the Second World War, Caterpillar’s products were widely used by the construction units of the United States Navy in the Pacific theatre of war for construction of airfields and other facilities. After the end of the war, the company grew rapidly on the back of the construction boom. Caterpillar used acquisition as a major vehicle for growth from 1950 onwards. Its first major acquisition was Trackson, based in Milwaukee. Over the year, it has acquired companies throughout the globe in order to drive up its sales. During the 1980s, the company was threatened by a decrease in demand because of heightened competition with its Japanese rival Komatsu. Moreover, US embargo against USSR also harmed the company because the company was all set to sell equipments worth millions of dollars to the USSR. The results of these losses were lay-offs and labour union issues subsequently. Caterpillar, in response to strike called by its unionized workforce, farmed out much of its production and warehousing to outside firms. It also started shifting its facilities to Southern states where labour laws were more favourable for non unionized workers. In the late 1990s, Caterpillar was hurt by the Asian crisis. It had to close down Caterpillar Shanghai Engine, a joint venture with the Chinese government owned Shanghai Diesel. In 2000, it received loans worth $29